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  • CBS Announces Crews for NFL Coverage For 2014

    Screen-Shot-2013-10-22-at-8.05.50-AM

    The NFL on CBS for 2014 has announced their TV pairings for the upcoming season. Here’s the crews:

    Jim Nantz/Phil Simms//Tracy Wolfson

    Ian Eagle/Dan Fouts

    Greg Gumbel/Trent Green

    Kevin Harlan/Rich Gannon

    Spero Dedes/Solomon Wilcots

    Andrew Catalon/Steve Beuerlein/Steve Tasker

    Here’s the presser that CBS sent out earlier today:

    The CBS Television Network will begin its 55th year of broadcasting the NFL with Jim Nantz, Phil Simms and Tracy Wolfson leading THE NFL ON CBS into the Network’s 2014 NFL season. Nantz, Simms and Wolfson will call the full slate of Thursday Night Football games on CBS and the NFL Network, along with selected Sunday games on CBS. Sean McManus, Chairman, CBS Sports, and Executive Producer, THE NFL ON CBS, announced today several changes to the 2014 announcer line-up along with the complete list of broadcast pairings.

    Ian Eagle and Dan Fouts have been named THE NFL ON CBS’s No. 2 announce team and will call the network’s top game on Sundays when Nantz and Simms do not call a game.

    Wolfson, who served as the Network’s lead college football reporter for the past 10 years, will join the lead announce team of Nantz and Simms as THE NFL ON CBS lead reporter. In addition to Wolfson, THE NFL ON CBS will utilize additional sideline reporters during the season including Jenny Dell and Evan Washburn.

    THE NFL ON CBS announce team is solidified even more this year as the deepest in sports television as Greg Gumbel will team with newcomer Trent Green. THE NFL ON CBS announce team also will feature several new pairings including Kevin Harlan with Rich Gannon, Spero Dedes with Solomon Wilcots, and Andrew Catalon forming a three-man booth with Steve Tasker and Steve Beuerlein.

     
  • NFL Says The 50th Super Bowl Will Officially Be Known As “Super Bowl 50″

    espnapi_nfl_e_sb_50_b1_576x324_wmain

    The NFL instead of using a roman number for ’50′ for Super Bowl 50 (which by the way is the letter “L”) the league will use the number 50.

    It’s the first time the league will use numbers instead of Roman numerals, which the league has been using since Super Bowl V in 1971.

    So why the change? It looks better.

    “When we developed the Super Bowl XL logo, that was the first time we looked at the letter ‘L,’” Jaime Weston, the league’s vice president of brand and creative said.

    “Up until that point, we had only worked with X’s, V’s and I’s. And, at that moment, that’s when we started to wonder what will happen when we get to 50?”

    So pleasing to the eyes is more important than a 45-year tradition. So be it.

     
  • Round One Ends With Minnesota Taking QB Teddy Bridgewater

    2014 NFL Combine

    The Vikings stayed aggressive on Thursday night, moving back into round one with a trade with the Seattle Seahawks, and drafting QB Teddy Bridgewater, who some said could have gone as early as #1 to the Texans.

    Bridgewater had an awful Pro Day, which is what killed him going early in round one. As a pocket passer, he’s going to have to earn his paycheck with his arm and his brains, looking down field for open receivers.

    In His first two seasons at Louisville, Bridgewater has had 478 completions for 715 attempts with 5,847 yards and 41 touchdowns.

    Here’s CBS’ Scouting Report on Bridgewater

    Bridgewater arrived at Louisville as the No. 2-rated quarterback prospect in the nation by Rivals.com after an accomplished high school career in Miami that included setting the Dade County record with seven touchdown passes in a single game. He was second team All-State 6-A and played in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl.

    Bridgewater, who succeeded former Hurricanes quarterback Jacory Harris at Northwestern High School, also originally committed to Miami before ultimately landed at Louisville.

    Bridgewater wasted no time in making a major impact at Louisville. He was the first true freshman to play quarterback for the Cardinals since Brian Brohm in 2004, and the first true freshman quarterback to start since Stu Stram in 1976.

    He set the school freshman passing record with 2,129 yards to go along with 14 touchdowns in being named the Big East Rookie of the Year in 2011. Bridgewater completed 64.5 percent of his passes, although he did throw 12 interceptions.

    Bridgewater continued his ascent as a sophomore, being named Big East Offensive Player of the Year after throwing for 3,718 yards with 27 touchdowns. He had six 300-yard passing games and two of 400-plus. Bridgewater was named the MVP of the Sugar Bowl after passing for 266 yards and two touchdowns in a win over third-ranked Florida.

    With Louisville suffering its only loss of the 2012 season to Central Florida, Bridgewater was relegated to second-team all-conference honors. He finished the regular season with 2,309 passing yards and 14 touchdowns, and then tacked on another 447 yards and three touchdowns in Louisville’s 36-9 romp over Miami in the Citrus Bowl.

    While Bridgewater’s arm is impressive, the poise, vision and touch he demonstrates could serve as a “how-to” video on effective quarterback play.

    Critics will continue to point out Bridgewater’s flaws. He is not as big or strong as Andrew Luck nor as nimble as a healthy Robert Griffin III. Among the quarterbacks potentially available in the 2014 draft, he’s the most polished and accurate.

     
  • Philadelphia Takes Louisville DE Marcus Smith w/ 26th Pick

    A great pick for the Eagles, as they take Louisville DE Marcus Smith with the 26th pick in the first round.

    Smith comes to the team at 6’3, 251, and can be a force on special teams and hopefully a part of the defense early in his career.

    Pete Pricsco of CBS says this of the pick: Marcus Smith: Eagles need a young pass rusher, and he provides that. Athletic and fits the scheme. I get it. GRADE: B

    Here’s a scouting report on Smith:

    Marcus Smith is an edge player who burst onto the scene as a senior. He was the wild card in head coach Charlie Strong’s hand. Smith’s versatility allowed Strong to move him all over the field and give opposing offenses fits. Smith played on the edge, from the interior and even lined up over slot receivers.

    He translates as that type of linebacker in the NFL. His size and frame could tempt a team to build him into a 4-3 defensive end as well. Smith’s explosive movements and instincts make him a high-upside pass-rusher. If his pass-rush repertoire and hand usage can be developed by an NFL coaching staff, he could become a high-level edge-defender on Sundays.

    2014 NFL Combine

     
  • Jets Take Louisville Safety Calvin Pryor w/ 18th Pick

    Louisville v Kentucky

    Here’s the Walter Football Scouting Report on Pryor:

    Dangerous. That would be the word describe the middle of the field with Pryor lurking. If receivers aren’t ready, Pryor can knock them out for a week with devastating hits. Over the past three seasons, he was a physical force for Louisville.

    Pryor first saw playing time as a freshman in 2011. He had a solid debut with 43 tackles, two forced fumbles and two interceptions. He improved his game significantly as a sophomore, notching 100 tackles and five forced fumbles for 2012. Pryor continued his strong play in 2013 with 75 tackles, three interceptions, four passes broken up and two forced fumbles on the season.

    For the NFL, Pryor is a tough in-the-box safety. He is an excellent run-defender who functions well as the eighth man in the box. Pryor is a good tackler and is instinctive.

    For pass defense, Pryor is best at zone coverage in the intermediate portion of the field. He didn’t play a lot of deep centerfield, nor was he often used in man coverage against tight ends and slot receivers. Those areas will be the most critical challenges for Pryor at the next level as his value will increase if can develop some man-coverage skills.

    Pryor is a play-maker with an ability to cause turnovers. With his hard hitting, he separates the ball from receivers and forces a lot of fumbles. Pryor had five interceptions in his collegiate career, and but has the capacity to keep getting better at picking off passes with some pro coaching.

    Sources have said they believe that Pryor could go in the 20s because he isn’t considered to be a special athlete with speed. As one source said about Pryor and HaHa Clinton-Dix, “Neither one of these guys is an Earl Thomas-like athlete.” That was proven at the Combine when both had solid but unspectacular 40 times of 4.58 seconds. Clinton-Dix looked better in the field drills and Pryor had a quality pro day, but neither one dominated the Combine.

    In the 2014 NFL Draft, Pryor looks like a mid- to late first-round pick. He should quickly become an impact starter as a strong safety in the NFL. Dangerous. That would be the word describe the middle of the field with Pryor lurking. If receivers aren’t ready, Pryor can knock them out for a week with devastating hits. Over the past three seasons, he was a physical force for Louisville.

    Pryor first saw playing time as a freshman in 2011. He had a solid debut with 43 tackles, two forced fumbles and two interceptions. He improved his game significantly as a sophomore, notching 100 tackles and five forced fumbles for 2012. Pryor continued his strong play in 2013 with 75 tackles, three interceptions, four passes broken up and two forced fumbles on the season.

    For the NFL, Pryor is a tough in-the-box safety. He is an excellent run-defender who functions well as the eighth man in the box. Pryor is a good tackler and is instinctive.

    For pass defense, Pryor is best at zone coverage in the intermediate portion of the field. He didn’t play a lot of deep centerfield, nor was he often used in man coverage against tight ends and slot receivers. Those areas will be the most critical challenges for Pryor at the next level as his value will increase if can develop some man-coverage skills.

    Pryor is a play-maker with an ability to cause turnovers. With his hard hitting, he separates the ball from receivers and forces a lot of fumbles. Pryor had five interceptions in his collegiate career, and but has the capacity to keep getting better at picking off passes with some pro coaching.

    Sources have said they believe that Pryor could go in the 20s because he isn’t considered to be a special athlete with speed. As one source said about Pryor and HaHa Clinton-Dix, “Neither one of these guys is an Earl Thomas-like athlete.” That was proven at the Combine when both had solid but unspectacular 40 times of 4.58 seconds. Clinton-Dix looked better in the field drills and Pryor had a quality pro day, but neither one dominated the Combine.

    In the 2014 NFL Draft, Pryor looks like a mid- to late first-round pick. He should quickly become an impact starter as a strong safety in the NFL.

     
 
 
 
 
 

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